Information for Faculty

Forms and Resources

Affirmative Action and Equity Plan and Recruitment Procedures

Original document approved September 2000; revisions approved November 2003

Affirmative Action Plan
The Department of Social Science is committed to a policy of employment equity, and in particular to foster the recruitment of women, aboriginal people, members of racial minorities, and people with disabilities (i.e., "handicaps," as defined by the Ontario Human Rights Code, Part II, s.10, [1], [a]) within the framework of hiring needs, academic standards, and the university's contractual obligations. The Departments's Affirmative Action and Equity Plan seeks to correct any previous patterns of discrimination in academic hiring, to reap the benefits of diversity, and to have its faculty more nearly reflect the multi-racial and multi-ethnic nature of its student body and the metropolitan region in which the university is located.

Contact: Kimberley White (Chair) Department of Social Science, kjwhite@yorku.ca

Affirmative Action List
The Chair of the Deparment is responsible for communicating to the Department by 1 September of each year a list of tenure-stream faculty and the percentage of females among them. Cross-appointed faculty are counted in conformity with the fraction of their appointment in the Department. Faculty seconded from other units are not included in the Departments's count.

Affirmative Action and Equity Representative
Each year, the Department of Social Science elects an Affirmative Action and Equity Representative (hereafter referred to as the AAE Representative) who is responsible for counselling the Department on implementing its Affirmative Action and Equity Plan (hereafter referred to as the AAE Plan) in its recruitment processes, and who brings to the attention of the relevant committees any matter of concern relating to affirmative action and equity within the hiring process. This officer is expected to meet with and advise the Chair of Social Science, the Executive Committee, and each search committee at the beginning of the recruitment process to ensure that the principles and procedures of the Plan are adhered to.

Identifying Hiring Priorities
The Department formulates its hiring priorities within the framework of a five-year academic plan and annual updates of the plan. Priorities are determined through a process of wide and open consultation within the Department and are recommended by the Executive Committee to the Department Council, which votes on the final recommendations on new appointments to the Dean of Arts. The priorities take into account such factors as student demand, imminent retirements, existing commitments within the Department to particular fields, and emerging fields of interdisciplinary inquiry in social science. The Department recognizes that the choice of fields of research and teaching as hiring priorities may influence the number of applicants from designated groups (i.e., women, aboriginal people, members of racial minorities, and people with disabilities), and therefore attempts to consider fields, or branches of fields, in which these groups are well represented. Programs and fields within the Department making a recommendation about hiring priorities should indicate how affirmative action for designated groups has been taken into account in determining areas of specialization and required qualifications.

Hiring Procedures - The Search
Once hiring priorities have been established and approved by the Dean of Arts, advertisements for any positions to be filled during the current academic year are drafted by the Chair of the Department and the Executive Committee. The wording of the advertisement must contain the university's standard language on affirmative action and equity. A preliminary draft of the advertisement is then presented to the Department Council for amendment or ratification.

The Department then engages in proactive search procedures to elicit the largest possible number of qualified candidates from designated groups. The Chair and Executive Committee, in consultation with the chair of each staffing sub-committee, circulates the advertisement(s) to all of the following:

a) the Department's home page;

b) CAUT Bulletin and University Affairs;

c) specialized journals, websites, computerized lists, and university departments relevant to the position being filled;

d) journals, organizations, computerized networks, and individuals that are likely to reach female applicants, including Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (Ottawa), Resources for Feminist Research (OISE), Canadian Women's Studies (York), and any other more specialized channels of communication devoted to scholarship on women;

e) journals, organizations, computerized networks, and individuals that are likely to reach communities of aboriginal people, racial minorities, or people with disabilities.

Direct contact is also made with academics and others active in the field for which applicants are sought, to ask them both to encourage qualified candidates to apply and to provide names of such persons whom the Department might seek out directly.

From year to year, the AAE Representatives are expected to accumulate a list of such contacts for advertising positions.

A list of all contacts made in one search must be presented to the AAE Representative at the beginning of each search and inserted into the search file.

Hiring Procedures - Appointment Committees
Once a decision has been made to proceed with an appointment, the Executive Committee is constituted as the Executive Staffing Committee. The Chair and the Executive Committee are responsible for recruiting individual faculty members within the Department to a staffing sub-committee, at least one member of which is a member of the Executive Committee, and at least one of which is from outside the field from which the candidate is being recruited (faculty members from outside the Department may be included where appropriate). The AAE representative is a non-voting, ex-officio member of the staffing sub-committee. The Chair of the Department (or his/her designate) is a non-voting, ex-officio member of the sub-committee. Each member of the sub-committee is given a copy of this Plan.

The sub-committee is responsible for:

a) advertising the position(s);
b) short-listing the qualified candidates;
c) arranging on-campus interviews that allow for the participation of faculty, teaching assistants, and students;
d) soliciting input from Department members;
e) recommending a candidate for appointment

The Executive Staffing Committee and the staffing sub-committee should always include both male and female members. The Department will arrange for Equity Training workshops to be held for members of staffing sub-committees.

Where an applicant for an advertised position has self-identified as a member of one of the designated minority groups, the acknowledgement letter from the Chair should repeat this identification.

The sub-committee meets following the closing date for applications. The sub-committee agrees on a non-exhaustive set of common questions to be asked to all candidates. The AAE Representative must be in attendance at its first meeting to inform the sub-committee about provisions in the collective agreements of unionized instructors at York University (i.e., YUFA and CUPE) governing full-time appointments and to assess the extent and success of the advertising for the appointment. The sub-committee begins its deliberations by considering a written list of the places where the position was advertised (which must be inserted into the search file) and the appropriateness of the number of applicants from designated groups in the light of the recruitment process and the potential pools of applicants from designated groups in the area. If, in consultation with the Chair of the Department and the AAE Representative, the sub-committee believes that additional advertising efforts might increase the number of qualified applicants, then it may recommend to the Executive Staffing Committee that the search be extended. If the Executive Staffing Committee is satisfied that appropriate efforts have been made to elicit the application of candidates from designated groups, the sub-committee proceeds with the preparation of a short list.

Hiring Procedures - The Short List
Members of the sub-committee examine and evaluate each file in view of the requirements outlined in the job description and in this Plan. Each member of the sub-committee prepares and presents his/her short list to the sub-committee as a whole. Whether or not their names appear on individual short lists, the files of all female applicants and all applicants from minority groups who have self-identified are fully discussed and considered by the whole sub-committee.

The sub-committee submits its short list to the Executive Staffing Committee, which, with the chair of the sub-committee and the AAE Representative in attendance, considers whether the principles and procedures of the AAE Plan have been adhered to. It either approves the list and passes it on to the Dean of Arts for vetting, or sends it back to the staffing sub-committee for reconsideration.

Hiring Procedures - The Interviewing Process
With the Dean's approval, the short-listed candidates are invited to the university. The interview process includes:

a) briefing by the Chair of the Department on the university, the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, the Department of Social Science, any relevant programs, and other general information;

b) where possible, a meeting with the AAE representative to explain the collective agreement, including the affirmative action provisions;

c) informal meetings with the relevant program co-ordinator(s), members of their program executives, or any other members of the Department who express an interest;

d) a formal presentation of research interests and teaching ideas in a well-advertised meeting of Department members, chaired by a member of the sub-committee and open to faculty, teaching assistants, and students, who are given an opportunity to pose questions to the candidate; except in unusual and unavoidable circumstances, all voting members of the sub-committee must attend these presentations;

e) a meeting with the sub-committee.

Every effort is made to ensure that female faculty members meet with female applicants informally, and especially that they attend the applicants' presentations.

During this process, Department members are encouraged to submit written assessments of the candidates based on the interviews and, if possible, a reading of the applicants' files, which contain letters of application, curriculum vitae, letters of reference, publications, and other materials submitted by applicants themselves. These written assessments must be signed.

Hiring Procedures - Criteria for Selection
Within the process of affirmative action and equity hiring and consistent with the level and nature of the advertised appointment, all successful candidates should have displayed the following qualifications through their applications and interviews:

a) Canadian citizenship or permanent-resident status (only after determining that there are no eligible Canadian applicants does the sub-committee consider candidates without Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status);

b) Ph.D. or equivalent (professional degree, or experience/expertise strongly recognized in the area), or Ph.D. pending;

c) an interdisciplinary perspective and an awareness of new areas of intellectual development;

d) demonstrated strength in scholarship, and an active, ongoing program of research, communicated through professional channels and, where possible, through other modes that reach a broader public;

e) demonstrated excellence or clear potential in undergraduate teaching and capacity for graduate instruction and supervision;

f) a commitment to collegiality in university decision-making;

Hiring Procedures - The Selection
Once all the short-listed candidates have been interviewed and all material in their files (including letters of reference and submitted publications) have been read by members of the sub-committee, it meets to select the most suitable candidate for the position. The sub-committee's AAE representative must be present at this meeting.

Candidates are substantially equal unless one candidate can be demonstrated to be superior. If the annual count of tenure-stream faculty in the Department indicates that the proportion of females is below 40 per cent, when candidates' qualifications are substantially equal, the candidate who is both female and a member of a visible/racial minority, an aboriginal person, or a person with a disability is recommended for appointment. In the absence of female minority candidates, when candidates' qualifications are substantially equal, a candidate who is female, or one who is a male and a member of a visible/racial minority, an aboriginal person, or a person with a disability is recommended for appointment. If there is no female or minority candidate, the male candidate is recommended.

If the annual count of tenure-stream faculty in the Department indicates that the proportion of females is 40 per cent or more, a candidate who is a member of a visible/racial minority, an aboriginal person, or a person with a disability is recommended for appointment, unless a candidate who does not belong to these groups can be demonstrated to be superior.

If the sub-committee is not satisfied that there is a qualified candidate in the pool of applicants, or if there is serious disagreement among sub-committee members, it may also choose not to recommend any of the candidates.

The chair of the sub-committee prepares a written report on its recommendation for an appointment, which must be approved by a majority of the sub-committee. That report must review the search procedure, giving particular emphasis to the requirements of this Plan, must contain a comparison of all short-listed candidates, and must indicate clearly why the chosen candidate is superior to the others. It must also incorporate the report of the sub-committee's Affirmative Action and Equity representative on affirmative action and equity issues during the search.

The sub-committee's recommendation is forwarded to the Executive Staffing Committee, which assesses the procedures followed during the search. If not satisfied with the procedures, that committee may return the recommendation to the sub-committee for further deliberation. If satisfied with the procedures of the search, the Executive Staffing Committee approves the recommendation for presentation to the Department Council. The AAE Representative must attend the meetings of the Executive Staffing Committee and the Department Council meeting where the recommendation is to be ratified. The Department Council may accept or reject the recommendation, or refer it back to the staffing sub-committee for further deliberation.

After the Department Council has ratified the recommendation, the Chair of the Department prepares a written report to the Dean of Arts, reviewing the search procedure and providing a rationale for the recommendation.

Hiring Procedures - Affirmative Action and Equity Representative

  • accumulates a list of appropriate contacts for advertising positions to women and designated minority groups. receives a list of all contacts made in one search.
  • meets with the staffing sub-committee to explain the Department's AAE Plan and to consider whether the advertisements for the position have generated sufficient applications from women and designated minority groups.
  • meets with the Executive Staffing Committee during its consideration of the sub-committee's recommended short list.
  • prepares a written report on all procedures relating to the Affirmative Action and Equity Plan for the Executive Staffing Committee, which is included in the recruitment file to be forwarded to the Dean of the faculty.
  • meets with the Executive Staffing Committee to participate in its consideration of the sub-committee's recommendation.
  • attends the Department Council meeting where the recommendation is ratified.
    presents a written assessment of the operation of the Plan at the end of each academic year.

The Adjudicating Committee

Composition of the Adjudicating Committee

There will be 6-8 members of the committee from the tenure-stream faculty with the Chair of the Division as a member ex officio. The Executive Committee of the Division of Social Science shall appoint the Chair of the Adjudicating Committee. In years with three or less files to prepare and adjudicate, the number of members from each File Preparation Committee shall be two (2); in years when the number is greater than three, the number of members from each File Preparation Committee shall be one (1). In the case of a cross-appointed candidate, there will be consultation with the second department about representation on the Adjudicating Committee.

By September 15th the Adjudicating Committee shall solicit student representatives by appropriate means, including a call for candidates on the Social Science Listserv. It should be ascertained that there are no conflicts or relations affecting impartiality between the student and the candidate under consideration for tenure and promotion. The importance of confidentiality should be emphasized as well. When there are more than two volunteers, the Adjudicating Committee shall select two representatives on the basis of a short written submission concerning their qualifications for and interest in membership.

The Adjudicating Committee shall select by vote the members of each File Preparation Committee, with the exception of the member(s) named by the candidate.

The Adjudicating Committee Report shall be particularly attentive to producing an adequate statement of the committee's rationale for its decision in each of the three areas (teaching, scholarship and service). However, in the case of promotion to full professor the committee may decide not to base its report on these three individual sets of criteria but a more holistic view of the candidates file.

Conflict of Interest Guidelines
It is incumbent on any member of the File Preparation Committee and/or the Adjudicating Committee who believes that there may be a conflict of interest to declare it at the beginning of any process. A "test" for deciding if there is a conflict is to ask: "Would a reasonable person observing the situation from the outside, who is apprised of the details, think that your judgment would be filtered through the relationship in question?". Once a committee member declares a potential conflict of interest and has declared his/her own position on the conflict, a decision shall be rendered by the Adjudicating Committee as to the existence of a conflict of interest as well as to the resolution.

If the member is sitting on the Adjudicating Committee, he/she shall excuse himself/herself from the ensuing discussion and the rest of the Committee shall make the decision. Once the question of conflict of interest is resolved, the Adjudicating Committee shall provide the Executive Committee with "…a rationale and/or explanation of how the committee resolved that there was no conflict or what steps they took to address and ensure that the potential conflict of interest was mitigated" (quoted from Handbook for Academic Administrators, Academic Appointment Process).

The Executive Committee shall review the resolution of the conflict of interest for approval.

Adjudication
Adjudication for Tenure and/or Promotion to Associate Professor - According to the Senate guidelines, a favourable recommendation for either Tenure and/or Promotion to Associate Professor requires "either demonstrated superiority (excellence) in a minimum of one of the three categories outlined above [Scholarship, Teaching and Service], with at least competence demonstrated in teaching and in professional contributions and standing [Scholarship], or at least high competence in all three categories." (Senate Tenure and Promotion Documents, 2004, page 9).

Pattern Scholarship Teaching Service
A Excellence Competence Competence not demonstrated
B Competence Excellence Competence not demonstrated
C Competence Competence Excellence
D High competence High competence High competence

Adjudication for Promotion to Full Professor - Unlike the guidelines for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor, the Adjudication Committee is not required to make individual decisions in each of the three areas of Teaching, Professional Contribution and Service, but may make an overall decision on the candidate's file.

As noted in the Division's submission for its most recent program review (1999-2000), "the Division of Social Science is one of two departments in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies specifically mandated to carry out York University's long-standing commitment to interdisciplinary education." Moreover, its members "bring to their teaching, scholarship and community service a determination to apply critical interdisciplinary perspectives to the study of social experience." The research they undertake tends to be "methodologically and theoretically creative, wide- ranging and often related to communities outside the university." Among themselves, "members of the Division nurture an open, supportive intellectual culture that integrates and enhances the critical insights of many disciplinary practices."

Benefit and Expense Forms

Documents and Forms

For Assistance Contact:

Full -Time Faculty:

Anna Hoffmann,
ext. 33809,
ahoffman@yorku.ca

CUPE 3903 members:

Unit 1 and Unit 2 CUPE
office at 104 East Office Building
416-736-5133.

Support Staff:

Anna Hoffmann,
ext. 33809,
ahoffman@yorku.ca

Computer Leases

The Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies has instituted (as of September, 2001) a computer leasing Plan, whereby full-time faculty members receive a new leased computer once every three years. A basic PC or Mac computer is provided; should faculty want a computer with more enhancements, they can pay for the upgrade out of their PEA or research grants. Details of computer configuration are updated frequently. You need to complete a requisition form stating the make and model of the machine and forward it directly to eServices.

Faculty members who are in need of advice in the purchase of computing equipment or software can consult with Janet Brewer, jbrewer@yorku.ca

CUPE Forms

Blanket Application Forms

These blanket applications can be picked up from the Department of Social Science or they may be downloaded forms:

Contact Lil Di Giantommaso, ext. 77799, lilianad@yorku.ca

Teaching Assistant Workload Forms

Course directors with teaching assistants must submit teaching-asistant workload forms. The forms must be filled out and signed at both a September and a January meeting.

Contact Lil Di Giantommaso, ext. 77799, lilianad@yorku.ca

Department Infrastructure

Assignment Drop Boxes
An assignment drop-off box is assigned for each course to be used when students are unable to submit assignments in class. The boxes, which course directors should check on a regular basis, are opposite S 748 Ross; a key is available from the staff in the Main Office. (Please note that Department regulations prohibit the Main Office staff from receiving coursework from students.)

Contact: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Classroom Changes
For inquiries about the possibility of classroom changes please contact Alda Lone via e-mail. A request for classroom change must contain an explanation of the defficiencies of the current classroom assignment, the course number, date, time and current location of the class. If possible please also include any alternative rooms that would be acceptable. Please note that there is no guarantee that classroom change request can be fulfilled.

Contact: Alda Lone, ext. 77797, alone@yorku.ca for further assistance

Fax Machine (Ross Building)
The Department has a fax machine in S 745 Ross. Teaching staff will be given an account number at the start of each session, and long-distance charges for faxes will be billed to the account monthly.

CONTACT: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Keys For CUPE Teaching Staff
CUPE Teaching staff receive keys for their offices at the start of each teaching session. We require a small deposit that will be refunded at the end of the academic session when the key is returned.

CONTACT: Tara Wlodarczyk, ext. 33809, tarawlo@yorku.ca for further assistance

LISTSERV - Social Science Department
The listserv is our main medium of communication. We ask that all teaching faculty subscribe to it. (The listserv address is sosc@yorku.ca; everyone is advised to send personal responses to a message to the sender not the entire listserv.)

CONTACT: Leah Dunton, ext. 33430, ldunton@yorku.ca ( who will add or delete your name from the listserv.)

Room Bookings
The lounge in S 752 Ross, S 768 Ross and S 710 Ross are used exclusively for various Social Science meetings. (If there are any special requests for the use of this room other than for a meeting, it must be approved by the Chair of the Department; the lounge may not be used as classroom space.)

CONTACT: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Mailboxes
Mailboxes in S 745 Ross are available for teaching staff with offices in the Ross Building. If you are not housed in the Ross Building and require a mailbox there, contact the Social Science Main office. For security reasons, S 745 Ross is not accessible to students; it is against Department regulations to suggest to students that they deliver any kind of coursework or mail to a box in the mail room. Drop boxes in the corridor are available for this purpose.

CONTACT: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Main Office - Hours of Operation
The Department of Social Science is open for student inquiries from 9:00 - 4:00 p.m. For faculty inquiries the main office is open from 8:30 - 4:30 p.m.

CONTACT: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Maintenance Service
If you experience maintenance difficulties in an office in the Ross Building or any other Seventh Floor space, please notify the Social Science office.

CONTACT: Tara Wlodarczyk, ext. 33809, tarawlo@yorku.ca for further assistance

Office Allocation
Teaching staff not housed in another building on campus are provided an office on the Seventh Floor of the Ross Building. Notify Anna Hoffmann if you have office space elsewhere.

CONTACT: Tara Wlodarczyk, ext. 33809, tarawlo@yorku.ca for further assistance

Office Hours - Teaching Staff
All teaching staff are expected to make themselves available to students outside of class-time. A memo will be sent out to all teaching staff by Alda Lone at the beginning of September. Asking for your office hours, office location, email address, home address and telephone number and whether any of these components given out to students. This must be filled out as soon as possible and returned. Please post office hours on your office door and let the course secretary know the time(s). If you are available to students at other times or in a different location please make sure you indicate this as well.

Contact: Alda Lone, ext. 77797, alone@yorku.ca or the program assistant for your course.

Academic Administration

Chair of the Department:
JJ McMurtry
S 754 Ross, 416-736-2100, extension 77812
jmcmurtr@yorku.ca

Undergraduate Program Director
Peggy Keall
416-736-2100 extension 77176,
email: peggy@yorku.ca

Foundations Coordinator:
Nalini Persram
416-736-2100 extension 46012
email: persramn@yorku.ca

Organization - Committees and Officers

Department of Social Science Committees - 2013-14

Executive Committee
Kimberley White, Peggy Keall, Mark Peacock, Eduardo Canel, Doug Young, Uwa Idemudia, Amanda Glasbeek

Curriculum Committee
Eduardo Canel, Doug Young, Kean Birch, Carla Lipsig-Mumme, Peggy Keall, Nalini Persram

Tenure & Promotion Adjudication Committee
Mark Peacock, Kimberley White, Megan Davies, Kamala Kempadoo, Eduardo Canel, Darryl Reed, James Williams, Matthew McManus

Tenure & Promotion File Preparation Committees
Fahim Quadir (Professor); Viviana Patroni (Chair), Eduardo Canel, Darryl Reed
Allyson Lunny (Assoc.Prof); Annie Bunting (Chair), Kamala Kempadoo, James Williams

Nominations Committee
Lisa Drummond, Pablo Idahosa, Kimberley White

Department Council Chair
Miriam Smith

Research and Ethics
Miriam Smith, Denielle Elliott, Mark Peacock

Communications Committee
Stephanie Ross, Megan Davies, Tanja Juric, Merouan Mekouar

International/External Committee
Uwa Idemudia, Les Jacobs, Caroline Hossein
Teaching Development
Anita Lam, Annie Bunting, Allyson Lunny, Nalini Persram

Academic Honesty
Paul Baxte, Jennifer Hyndman, Judy Hellman, Jacqueline Krikorian, Soren Frederiksen, Jaime Llambias-Wolff

Grades Reappraisal
Jay Goulding, Alina Marquez

Affirmative Action & Equity Officers
Amanda Glasbeek, Anna Pratt, Jan Kainer

YUFA Stewards
JJ McMurtry, Richard Wellen

Photocopying
Teaching staff will be given both a personal photocopy account number and a photocopy account number for each Department course in which they work. The latter numbers are strictly for photocopying course material; please do all other photocopying using your personal account number. Please contact your program secretary to obtain your courses.

CONTACT: The Social Science Main office staff, 416-736-5054 for further assistance

Telephone - Long Distance
Each office has a telephone for the use of its assigned teaching staff. Invoices for personal long distance calls and additional telephone charges will be issued by Leah Dunton on a bi-monthly basis. Telephone invoices for personal calls can be paid by cheque, cash or from your PEA.

CONTACT: Leah Dunton, ext. 33430, ldunton@yorku.ca for further assistance

Telephone - Voice Mailboxes
Voice mailboxes are available on all phones and may be installed through a request to Anna Hoffmann. Unless faculty have taken on an administrative job, office occupants are responsible for the charge for voice mailbox installation and subsequent monthly charges.

CONTACT: Tara Wlodarczyk, ext. 33809, tarawlo@yorku.ca for further assistance.

Department Accommodation

Enrollment Permission

A completed Permission to Enrol form must be submitted by the student to the Undergraduate Enrolment Assistant, Alda Lone in Ross South 746 or Jacquie Selman Ross South 744 between the hours 9:00 and 3:30pm. The form can not be processed if it is dropped off at the Main office by the student or faculty member.

An enrolment spot will be opened only is there is space available in the course. If the course or tutorial is full or the room is at its maximum capacity the permission can not be granted. Student identification and a completed and signed form is required to process enrolment permission.

Enrolment permission form (PDF)

Grades Spreadsheets

Research Support Initiatives

Administered by the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

  • Dean’s Award for Outstanding Teaching
  • Dean’s Award for Outstanding Research
  • Dean’s Office Special Research Projects
  • Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Fellowships
  • Grant Incentives Program
  • Minor Research Grants (FARG)
  • Teaching Development Grants
  • York Computer Donation-Purchase Program
  • YUFA Conference/Travel Funds

Administered Outside the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

  • Contract Faculty Conference Travel Fund
  • Contract Faculty Professional Development Fund
  • Contract Faculty Research Grants Fund
  • Contract Faculty Teaching Development Fund
  • Elia Research Fund
  • Leave Fellowship Fund (Sabbatical)
  • Professional Expenses Allowance (YUFA)
  • Release Time Teaching Fellowships (YUFA)
  • Research Development Fellowships (YUFA)
  • Specific Research Grants
  • SSHRC Conference Travel Grants
  • SSHRC Small Grants
  • Supplementary Research Grants
  • Teaching – Learning Development Fund (YUFA)
  • Walter L. Gordon Research Fellowship
  • York Ad Hoc Research Funds
  • York Incentive Grant
  • York Policy Fora
  • York Seminar in Advanced Research

Undergraduate Ethics

Information and documentation you need to undertake the ethics review of undergraduate course-related, minimal risk, non-funded research in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies can be found at Undergraduate Ethics web site .

YUFA Research/Travel Funds

These funds are available to YUFA faculty members (tenure-stream, CLA, SRC, etc. but excluding visiting professors, YUFA exempt faculty members, YUFA members on leave other than sabbaticals) or those designated Senior Scholars may apply to their units for funding to travel to conferences.

Travel must occur between May 1, 2014 and April 30, 2015.

YUFA members who are cross-appointed between two departments in LA&PS should apply to the unit that claims more than 50% of their time. Those with a 50-50 split between two LA&PS units should apply to the unit that is identified as their home unit in the ARMs system.

Please submit your signed application form to the Administrative Assistant in Ross S755.

Maximum awards per faculty member will be $800.00.

Normally funding will be given only for conferences at which the faculty member is presenting a paper or participating in a panel. Faculty members with access to external funding such as a SSHRC grant are expected to access those funds first before applying to the YUFA fund.

Along with the applicaiton form please attach documentation about your participation (letter of acceptance for your paper proposal or a printed conference program) as well as a breakdown of all anticipated (or approximate) eligible expenses. Applications must be submitted prior to travel, but claims for reimbursement, along with all relevant receipts, will be accepted only upon return.

Eligible Expenses

Faculty members may put in claims for travel to the conference location, accommodation, registration fees, and per diem.

Claims for reimbursement of expenses must be submitted within 6 months of return from travel.

Faculty & Staff Responsibilities

Course Director
A course director is responsible for:

  • preparing course outlines and ensuring that these are delivered to the faculty secretary;
  • assembling course reading kits and, when they are produced, distributing kits to a course team please note that it is Department policy that reading kits be provided by a reproduction service that secures proper copyright permission — for example, the York bookstore);
  • providing in writing consistent with Senate legislation how a final course grade will be determined (including components of the grade, their relative weights, and any other elements of the final grade (for example, practices concerning work submitted late);
  • providing a basis on which students may make informed decisions about their standing in a course before the withdrawal dates; hence, marked work worth at least 10% of the final grade students should be returned to students by these dates and, if possible, further graded feedback should be made available by these dates. If, for any reason, graded work worth at least 10% of the final grade cannot be returned before the withdrawal deadline, the course director should advise students that they still may petition to drop the course and should advise the Petitions Committee that graded feedback was not provided by the withdrawal deadline;
  • maintaining communication with members of the teaching team through regular meetings and with all students in the course through office hours, telephone and/or e-mail;
  • preparing final examinations and acting as chief invigilator
  • ensuring that parallel grading standards are maintained in all tutorials in a course, approving all final grades, and completing the final grade sheet and grade profile for the course. Distributed by Alda Lone, alone@yorku.ca for form pick up.
  • filing final exams, or equivalent work, in alphabetical order for each tutorial with the course secretary reappraising students’ grades as required during the year, and being available for consultation with the Grade Reappraisal Committee as required;
  • being available for consultation concerning petitions and appeals considered by relevant Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies and Senate committees;
  • implementing prescribed procedures concerning alleged cases of academic dishonesty.
  • meeting with Unit 1 Teaching Assistants to review their workload, which should not exceed 270 hours yearly TA Workload Form suggested guidelines;
  • evaluating contract faculty and teaching assistants at their request, consistent with the CUPE 3903 Collective Agreement;
  • distributing course evaluation forms, which are required by Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies regulations
  • being aware of Sessional and Religious Holidays Dates

Faculty Secretary
A faculty secretary is responsible for:

  • all typing, correspondence and photocopying for a course (for which at least two working days’ notice is required);
  • ordering textbooks for a course (for which orders from faculty are due by June for autumn term and October for winter term);
  • ensuring that copies of course material distributed in class are available for students in the Department’s main office;
  • ordering audio-visual equipment from ITC and audio-visual material from the York library (for which at least two working days’ notice is required);
  • ordering films not held at York (for which at the very least a week’s notice is required);
  • arranging for course books to be put on reserve in Scott library;
  • notifying students (when proper notice is received) with a sign on a classroom door if, for any reason, a class is cancelled;
  • undertaking non-course related clerical tasks as time permits (bearing in mind that time often does not permit, particularly during the campus’s busy seasons; faculty will be directed to the Missy Allen if a course secretary is unable to undertake extra work).

Tutorial leader
A tutorial leader is responsible for:

  • attending lectures and course meetings;
  • maintaining close liaison with students through formal tutorial hours and at least one weekly hour of office hours;
  • assisting students’ understanding of course content, and dealing with students’ writing problems through referrals to the Writing Centre.
  • maintaining grade books and attendance records;
  • advising and helping students who are in danger of failing a course;
  • reporting possible cases of academic dishonesty to Course Director.
  • consulting with the course director about grading standards;
  • submitting grades according to agreed deadlines;
  • in the case of Unit 1 tutors, meeting with the course director to discuss and review TA Workload Forms.

Teaching, Learning & Research Related Resources

The Writing Department
The Writing Department combines the resources and offerings of the units previously known as the Centre for Academic Writing in the Faculty of Arts and as Atkinson Writing Programs in Atkinson College. The Writing Department provides credit courses and, through its Writing Centre, one-to-one and small group instruction

Appointments can then be made by phone (416-736-5134) or in person (S329 Ross).

Office of the Ombudsperson
The role of the York University Ombudsperson is to provide an impartial and confidential service to assist current members of York University (students, faculty and staff) who have been unable to resolve their concerns about University authorities' application of York University policies, procedures and/or practices.

Contact Information

1050 York Research Tower
ombuds@yorku.ca
416-736-5641

Teaching Commons
Teaching Commons, located at 1050 TEL, provides advocacy for excellence and innovation in teaching and assists individuals, units and Faculties in improving student learning. They hold numerous workshops, seminars and public lectures tailored for new full-time faculty, for graduate students and for contract faculty. As well, they have an extensive resource library and maintain a useful listserv. Contact teaching@yorku.ca (or 736-5754) for specific information.

Counselling & Disability Services
Counselling & Disability Services (CDS), through its professional staff, strives to provide a range of essential psychological services to the York University Community in order to optimize the quality of the scholarly and communal life of the university. The primary aim of CDS is to help students realize, develop, and fulfill their personal potential in order to maximally benefit from their university experience. Achieving this aim requires that a range of programs as well as individual and group counselling are available to all students enrolled at the university. CDS also acts as a resource to faculty and staff of the university.

For more information contact us at 416-736-5297 or in Room N110, Bennett Centre for Student Services

York International
York International facilitates and coordinates the international activities of the university. As such, York International assists the University community in the identification and development of international research and scholarly opportunities [and] encourages and promotes the participation of the York community in international education including development of partnerships with institutions abroad and academic exchanges. York International provides support for international students at the University and acts as a liaison between the York community and other public and private organizations both in Canada and abroad.".

Room 108 Vanier College; telephone, 736-5177.

Office of Research Administration
The Office of Research Services (ORS) is responsible for implementing research policies and procedures determined by the academic bodies of the University. The general functions of ORS are to assist faculty members in obtaining research funding, to ensure that University policies on research are honored, to represent York in negotiations between funding agencies and University researchers, and to officially accept funds for sponsored research on behalf of the University.

ORS provides administrative support for the Senate Committee on Research (SCOR) and its subcommittees and, when appropriate, advises Senate and the President on research policies and regulations. ORS also liaises with Faculty Research Coordinators and Department Research Consultants and advises Faculty research communities on the development of research policies. Like the Office of the Associate Vice-President (Research), ORS maintains close contact with University Counsel, York International, Innovation York, and other parts of the University that are involved in matters relating to research. Finally, ORS represents the University in associations concerned with research policies and research administration.

York Research Tower,
Fifth Floor
telephone, 736-5055.

Telephone Information

Telephone - Long Distance

Each office has a telephone for the use of its assigned teaching staff. Invoices for personal long distance calls and additional telephone charges will be issued by Leah Dunton on a yearly basis. Telephone invoices for personal calls can be paid by cheque, cash or from your PEA.

Contact: Leah Dunton, ext. 33430, ldunton@yorku.ca for further assistance

Telephone - Voice Mailboxes

Voice mailboxes are available on all phones and may be installed through a request to Anna Hoffmann. Full time faculty members and administrative positions are eligibgle for Department paid voice mailboxes. All other office occupants are responsible for the charge for voice mailbox installation and subsequent monthly charges.

Contact: Anna Hoffmann, ext. 33809, ahoffman@yorku.ca for further assistance.

Crtiteria for Tenure and Promotion

Criteria for Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor

According to the Senate document

An Associate Professor is a matured scholar whose achievements at York and/or elsewhere has earned his or her colleagues' respect as an individual of superior qualities and achievements. A normal expectation of promotion to Associate Professor would be between three to six years of service in the rank of Assistant Professor ("B").

Under the rubric of "The Relation of Promotion to Tenure" it states the following:

The decision to grant tenure is one of the most important relationships between the faculty member and the University since it confers upon the scholar a continuing career appointment. It is, therefore, reasonable to assume that a candidate who has been judged worthy of tenure is normally worthy of being promoted to the rank of Associate Professor ("B").

The Adjudicating Committee shall normally assess the candidate who is considered to have earned tenure by the standards of the Department Guidelines for Tenure and Promotion to have also earned promotion to Associate Professor. Under exceptional circumstances, tenure may be granted while promotion is delayed. Exceptional circumstances, in keeping with the Senate document, shall fall, for example, under the rubric of the following:

  • medical circumstances - where certain extended and severe medical problems have delayed a candidate from realizing his/her promise;
  • major change in field of academic concentration;
  • documented high promise of excellence or high competence in the three criteria categories to be realized in the immediate future (i.e., no longer than two years);
  • exceptional conditions where extraordinary service was rendered by a candidate ("B").

Criteria for Teaching

To the extent that there are uniform criteria applicable to all Department faculty, they spring from two sources: A) the University's general criteria for teaching as set out in the Senate document; and B) a more specific set of intellectual values rooted in the Department's mandate and central to its academic identity.

University Criteria
According to the Senate Document, "Tenure and Promotions Criteria and Procedures" (approved March 21, 2002), assessments of teaching should reflect the following considerations:

Members of faculty perform many functions, but all are teachers. At the level of the university, teaching is itself an expression of scholarship. In an age of intense specialization generating an information explosion, the scholar who can take information and synthesize it into coherent structures of knowledge is performing an essential and sophisticated task. To be able to create an intelligible and intelligent university course is a very significant accomplishment. The facile distinction between teachers and researchers comes from another era when a graduate education conferred upon the teacher a long-lasting competence in a single field. ..

To assess the quality of a candidate's teaching, there are certain standards which can and should be applied within the University. The content of the teaching must be evaluated - whether it is conventional and routine, or whether scholarship is revealed through research, analysis, reflection, synthesis, and the expression of original work. The effectiveness of communication must also be considered, since communication is the essence of good teaching. The performance of the candidate must be assessed in terms of specific situations - i.e., with undergraduate or with graduate students, in groups and tutorials, in the laboratory or in the field, in small or large lectures. A candidate may be more effective in one situation than in others. While no one situation should be given a premium value to the detriment of others, a candidate should be superior in at least one area of teaching.

The judgement of colleagues must be brought to bear on the assessment of teaching performance; reliance on mere hearsay should be avoided. The direct expression of students' evaluation of teachers should be solicited.

Departmental Criteria
With due attention to a balanced assessment of teaching, professional contribution and service, and recognizing with the Senate document that "[t]eaching is itself an expression of scholarship," the Department regards teaching as a cornerstone of its mandate. There are two key features of this mandate. On the one hand, teaching in this unit encompasses many different approaches to knowledge offered under the twin rubrics of general education and the interdisciplinary programs. On the other hand, all Department course offerings share an emphasis on apprehending social experience from critical interdisciplinary perspectives. Accordingly, the teaching contributions of candidates should be assessed for their effectiveness in meeting this latter goal, while bearing in mind that there are many ways of being both "critical" and "interdisciplinary." In keeping with this emphasis, collegial assessors should be selected with the candidate's interdisciplinary expertise in mind and requested to respond, insofar as the assessor's expertise permits, to the question of the candidate's interdisciplinarity in their written assessments of the candidate's undergraduate and graduate teaching.

"Elements of Teaching" in the Department: Teaching in the Department involves delivering courses with socially relevant content and integrated curriculum that cultivate critical and interdisciplinary thinking. The relevance of content is assessed by the ability of the course to bring the life experiences of students to bear on the topic of instruction and discussion as well as to mobilize the topic to enable students to critically reflect upon their life experiences. The integration of content is assessed by the ability of the course director to provide an overall direction, sense, and organization of the course, integrating lectures, tutorials (if any), assignments and exams all together in a cohesive whole. Teaching in the Department involves challenging students with new ideas and perspectives to enable them to develop critical judgement. Teaching in the Department also involves adopting a caring and engaging approach toward students that is attuned to their needs and capacities while simultaneously challenging them by encouraging innovation and inventiveness. All together, these may be called "elements of teaching" in the Department.

"Formats of Teaching" in the Department: Teaching in the Department involves different formats ranging from lecture classes to seminars, reading courses, and tutorials. Some elements of teaching are easier to practice and more appropriate than others in some formats. While the Department does not yet have a graduate programme, Department faculty are involved in teaching graduate courses and supervision of graduate students in other units. The Department expects course directors to adopt appropriate elements of teaching for appropriate formats.

The Adjudication Committee will take into account a specific combination of elements and formats of teaching in which the candidate is involved. The Committee will look for the clarity of course outlines, quality of assignments, appropriateness of readings, communication skills with students, organizational capacities, ability to generate an atmosphere conducive to productive debate, ability to develop critical skills, effective integration of new technologies, contribution to curricular development and availability to students.

Criteria for Excellence: To be ranked as excellent, there has to be a consensus amongst collegial assessments, student letters, and numerical course evaluations that the candidate performs above the statistical means in the Department and that the candidate excels in at least several elements and/or formats of teaching. The collegial letters should explicitly address the elements of relevance, integration, organization, care and engagement, contextualizing these as regards the format of teaching assessed. Being involved in teaching-related administrative positions or being a recipient of teaching awards are also important indicators demonstrating excellence.

Criteria for High Competence: High competence in teaching is demonstrated by a combination of assessments that indicate that the candidate has performed around the averages in the Department in both qualitative and quantitative terms. The candidate must demonstrate strength in at least some elements and formats of teaching.

Criteria for Competence: Competence in teaching is demonstrated by a combination of assessments that indicate that the candidate has performed at the Department averages in some elements and formats of teaching. The candidate must also demonstrate strength in at least one of the elements and formats of teaching.

Criteria for Competence Not Demonstrated: The ranking of unproven competence will be given in cases where the candidate fails to demonstrate competence in any of the elements and formats of teaching in the Department or a serious failing in one or more.

File-based Criteria
Given that strength in teaching can take many forms, the assessment of that strength should be open to a wide range of evidence. For the guidance of the File Preparation and Adjudication Committees, some forms of evidence potentially relevant to a teaching file are listed below, grouped according to the three areas enumerated in the Senate Document. Candidates who supply an appropriate rationale may include other forms of evidence as well.

Contents of Teaching
Course creation: interdisciplinarity, innovation, creativity, quality of course-related materials;
Textbooks and other published teaching materials prepared by the candidate;
Knowledge of subject matter as demonstrated in syllabus and lectures;
Scholarship as demonstrated by evidence of research, analysis, reflection, and synthesis;
Evolution, renewal, of course content over time.
Other teaching and teaching-related work in or beyond the classroom: Graduate teaching and supervision (recognizing that, with the limited access to graduate programmes in the Department, opportunity for this responsibility is variable across fields and within programmes); supervising and mentoring tutorial leaders in lecture courses; Foundations course work on critical skills; Centre for Academic Writing; etc.

Effectiveness of Communication
Clarity of expression, appropriateness of level of 'pitch', ability to stimulate discussion, learning, critical thinking, general engagement;
Response to problems of second-language instruction;
Recognition of student diversity, including ethnicity, gender, race, age, and intellectual range.
Classroom management: Maintenance of an atmosphere conducive to learning; respect for students; pedagogical alertness to differences in background and level of ability; success in getting students to understand and care about the issues.

Participation and Performance in Specific Situations
Ability in a variety of teaching formats: large and small lectures, tutorials, one-to-one office hours, reading and guided research courses (including availability outside of the classroom), and fieldwork;
In keeping with the Senate criteria (quoted on page three above), letters to colleagues, teaching assistants and students soliciting assessment should include a request that they address the question of superiority in any one of these areas.
Other teaching and teaching-related work in or beyond the classroom: Graduate teaching and supervision (recognizing that, with the limited access to graduate programmes in the Department, opportunity for this responsibility is variable across fields and within programmes); supervising and mentoring tutorial leaders in lecture courses; Foundations course work on critical skills; Centre for Academic Writing; etc.;
Classroom management: Maintenance of an atmosphere conducive to learning; respect for students; pedagogical alertness to differences in background and level of ability; success in getting students to understand and care about the issues.

Criteria for Professional Contribution and Standing

In meeting its interdisciplinary mandate the Department has recruited faculty from a wide array of academic backgrounds. Moreover, its hiring practices have favoured applicants who show strength in more than one field and concerns that span conventional disciplinary boundaries. The result has been an astonishing diversity of intellectual profiles. While some of these fit readily into the contours of emerging interdisciplinary fields (such as Communication Studies or Law and Society), others are not so easily categorized. The challenge, then, is to frame criteria for Professional Contribution and Standing that are somehow uniform and yet responsive to the many different logics, standards and disciplinary practices appropriate to a very diverse collection of research careers.

University Criteria
According to the Senate Document, "Tenure and Promotions Criteria and Procedures" (approved March 21, 2002), assessments of Professional Contribution and Standing should reflect the following considerations:

In most cases distinction within a profession arises from the communication of knowledge or skills through public service, scholarly publication, or the production of works of art. Although publication and performance are not in themselves a guarantee of excellence, one recognises that these kinds of professional activity are addressed to communities larger than York University, and that, therefore, they must be judged in this larger professional context. In certain cases a distinguished public expression constitutes prima facie evidence that the quality of the work has been assessed and found to be of a high standard; in other cases it may be necessary to solicit assessments from specialists in the same field.

When the candidate has written or produced a work as part of a team or group in a research project, as often happens in the sciences, the nature of his or her contribution must be assessed.

Intellectual achievement may also be manifested by studies or activities that have been commissioned by governments or by private institutions. Contributions of this kind are significant, but they can be uneven and should always be evaluated by a recognized authority in the same field.

Generally, the quality of a candidate's scholarship will be evaluated in the light of judgements by reputable scholars; in cases where there may be Department within a discipline, the Department should describe the nature of the conflict among schools of thought and present the Committee with a wider range of professional opinion. Where the candidate is relatively junior, judgment should point not only to immediate achievement, but to the promise or lack of promise for further development.

The work performed by members of faculty for public and private institutions is indeed an integral part of the relationship between the University and the community. Communication with the general public in a variety of forms and media will be a continuing necessity for the modern university, and outstanding contributions of faculty in this area must be recognized. Service in an advisory capacity to various public agencies, presentation of lectures and talks to other than professional audiences, performances with radio and television networks - all such activity should be documented as evidence of any special capacity to enhance the intellectual relationship between the University and the community.

These activities must not be separated from the other criteria; they will be weighed in relation to the central core of responsibility which belongs to every member of faculty not only to transmit but to extend the boundaries of perception, understanding, and knowledge.

Departmental Criteria
Assessment of Departmental faculty should also give some weight to the core intellectual values associated with the Department's interdisciplinary mission. In practice this means that attention to methodological and theoretical creativity, success in bridging disciplines, discourses or fields of inquiry, and relevance to communities outside the university should balance assessment of the sheer volume or disciplinary rigour of a candidate's work.

The most highly valued intellectual practices in the Department include conducting and disseminating (by publishing and speaking) research that is interdisciplinary (not only crossing over disciplines but also genres such as art and science and sectors such as governmental and non-governmental), collaborative (involving partners from within and without academia) and engaging (addressing multitude of publics). Traditional values such as innovation and originality are assessed in conjunction with these specific practices. The contribution of faculty to their fields is assessed with respect to their advancement of these values with their research and its dissemination.

The Department faculty are expected to promote and facilitate the formation of intellectual communities (e.g., through editing journals, creating and/or moderating online discussions, and organizing conferences) and cultivating new intellectual frontiers (e.g., editing significant anthologies or organizing conferences). Collegial assessors are expected to comment on these core and traditional practices of scholarship both in terms of quality and quantity of publications, speeches and other instruments of dissemination.

While the following criteria specifically focus on expectations of the Department under normal circumstances as regards peer-reviewed publications, the Adjudication Committee considers a combination of qualitative and quantitative contributions of the candidate as well as a combination of other forms of contribution that crosses over genres and sectors. The Committee will consider, for example, development of exceptional web portals, arts installations, addressing various publics and scholarly involvement with major policy issues also as contributions to scholarship. The Department assumes that the assessment of excellence, high competence, and competence not demonstrated is a qualitative analytic process, even when the source of information may be quantitative.

Criteria for Excellence: A ranking of excellence demonstrates active, continuing and sustained contribution to scholarly research and dissemination of its results during the probationary period. While the Department recognizes that there are various ways of contributing to interdisciplinary research as mentioned above, it expects that the candidate has published peer-reviewed articles, chapters and/or book(s) in well respected scholarly presses and journals within his or her field. As judged by the reviewers, an excellent candidate will have established a coherent body of work recognized within candidate's field(s) as having made an original contribution through a consistent output of regular-length refereed journal articles, book chapters and/or book(s) during probation.

Criteria for High Competence: A ranking of high competence would normally require a reasonable output of regular-length refereed journal articles or book chapters during probation that may have not yet cohered into a recognizable contribution but show growing evidence of originality and creativity.

Criteria for Competence: A ranking of competence would normally require a reasonable output of regular-length refereed journal articles or book chapters during probation that may not have cohered into a recognizable body of work.

Criteria for Competence Not Demonstrated: A candidate who does not meet the minimum requirements for competence would receive a rank of unproven competence.

File-Based Criteria
While the above sets of criteria apply equally to all Departmental faculty, individual candidates should also be assessed by methods and standards appropriate to their specific research profiles. Normally the "Professional Contribution" section of a candidate's file contains three kinds of evidence: a detailed list of the candidate's scholarly contributions included in his/her curriculum vitae; a personal statement by the candidate (should he/she choose to provide one); and a set of letters by arms-length assessors in the candidate's field. A fair evaluation of the candidate's specific research profile requires a thoughtful integration of these elements as the file is prepared.

The Adjudicating Committee will assess the candidate's file in keeping with three sets of criteria, in order of priority: those in the Senate document, those cited in the paragraphs above, and those appropriate to the scholarly and other communities addressed by the candidate' research.

Criteria for Service to the University and Community

University Criteria
According to the Senate Document, "Tenure and Promotions Criteria and Procedures" (approved March 21, 2002), assessments of service to the University should reflect the following considerations:

Service to the University will take many forms. Service to the University is performed by faculty members through participation in the decision-making councils of the University, and through sharing in the necessary administrative work of Departments, Faculties, the University or the Faculty Associations not otherwise counted under professional contribution and standing. Reviewers, will attempt to discriminate among the kinds of administrative work in which a faculty member has participated. Contributions through committees and administrative offices should be assessed as an area for the display of knowledge and good judgement in the creation of new courses, programmes, Faculties, and Colleges.

The work of some committees is routine; obligations to serve on them from time to time are implicit in being a member of Faculty and deserve no special weight. Committees relevant to the making of academic policy, or major duties assumed at the request of the University or assumed on behalf of the Association which have led to its improvement, are clearly more important and will be given proper consideration.

In exceptional cases the University must recognise its responsibility for the fact that the growth of a candidate's scholarly and academic development may have lagged because of the large demands which important administrative work has made upon his/her time. In such circumstances the Senate Committee will require full information from persons familiar with the extent and nature of the candidate's participation in a major service activity.

Departmental Criteria
Of the three areas, teaching, professional contribution and service, for which the Adjudicating Committee is charged with developing procedures and criteria of assessment, service would probably seem to be the one least open to claims of Departmental specificity. Nevertheless, the Department houses 12 interdisciplinary programs whose co-ordination requires ongoing and demanding attention of Departmental Committees above and beyond the administrative requirements for managing each programme. All together, the Department faculty are often required to make considerable commitment to not only their programmes for which they are hired but also running Departmental Committees that hold it all together.

Moreover, while the Senate Document "Tenure and Promotion Criteria and Procedures" speaks of Service as "Service to the University", the Department's submission for program review in 1999-2000 refers less restrictively to "community service". ("The many instructors who have been gathered together in this unit bring to their teaching, scholarship, and community service a determination to apply critical interdisciplinary perspectives to the study of social experience".) This may be taken to indicate the Department's special understanding of its intellectual and societal vocation.

Indeed for many members of the Department the very nature of their teaching and scholarship may well be deemed to be inseparable from commitment to a variety of services rendered not just to the university but to the larger community and public of which the university is a part. Assessment of Departmental faculty in this area should thus reflect this enlarged view of service. Moreover, because the Department as a whole has no graduate program, many members teach and perform service by contributing to the administrative and committee work of various departmental graduate programs.

Recognizing the variable and limited access to graduate responsibilities within the Department, attention should be paid and recognition given to such extra-Departmental contributions. The rubric, Service to the University and Community, honours this enlarged view of service. Accordingly in evaluating the extent and quality of the candidate's Service, the following criteria will be used:

Regular participation on committees among the following areas: the Department, Departments, Colleges, Graduate Programs, Faculty, Senate, the University and Faculty Association;
Chairing any such committees;
Administrative work within the Department such as serving as Chair of the Department; Undergraduate Coordinator, Curriculum Coordinator or Coordinator of any of its Programs;
Administrative work outside the Department such as serving as Master or Academic Advisor of a College;
Service in an administrative or advisory capacity to various community organizations and public agencies outside the university including local, national and international organizations;
Addresses, lectures etc., of a public service nature.
Criteria for Excellence: A ranking of excellence demonstrates active, continuing and sustained contribution to the Department, university at large and various local, national and international communities in significant capacities. The ranking of excellence requires not only serving in these various capacities outlined above but also demonstrating fairness, effectiveness, judgement, collegiality, respectfulness and other attributes of strong collegial spirit and conduct as assessed by collegial reviews.

Criteria for High Competence: A ranking of high competence would normally require also reasonable and consistent involvement in service. But such participation must demonstrate the promise of strong collegial spirit and conduct as assessed by collegial reviews.

Criteria for Competence: A ranking of competence would normally require a reasonable involvement in service in any combination of capacities outlined above.

Criteria for Competence Not Demonstrated: A candidate who does not meet the minimum quantitative or qualitative requirements for competence would receive a rank of unproven competence.

File-based Criteria
Evaluation of these contributions will be based on the following sources: the applicant's curriculum vitae; letters of assessments of the applicant's work from Chairs and colleagues of committees, etc., on which the applicant served; letters of assessment by officers and members of community organizations and public agencies on which the applicant served.

Criteria for Promotion to Full Professor

University Criteria
In addition to its criteria for promotion to Associate Professor, the Senate document provides a general orientation to criteria for promotion to "Professor" ("Preamble"; "B"). According to the Senate document: A Professor is an eminent member of the University whose achievements at York and/or in his/her profession have marked him or her as one of the scholars from whom the University receives its energy and strength. Clearly this level of achievement cannot be identified with serving several years as an Associate Professor; nevertheless, the rank should not be considered a form of apotheosis. The rank of Professor should be within the expectancy of all Associate Professors ("B").

Department Criteria
The Adjudicating Committee shall base its recommendation regarding a candidate's promotion on this overall standard as well as on the more specific criteria found in the Senate document and these Departmental Guidelines. Here again the guiding assumption is that candidates have different strengths and there are many paths to eminence. Bearing this proviso in mind, an abstracted (i.e., "ideal typical") pattern might appear as some variation of the following:

  • Evidence of commitment and achievement in teaching
  • A record of "service" teaching, particularly to first and second year students
  • Significant commitment and accomplishment in graduate supervision (recognizing that Department members do not all have equal access to graduate teaching opportunities)
  • Documented curricular innovation and course development
  • Positive relations with and mentoring of teaching assistants
  • Two books or book equivalents (again bearing in mind that ".assessment of the sheer volume or disciplinary rigour of a candidate's work should be balanced by attention to its methodological and theoretical creativity, its success in bridging disciplines, discourses or fields of inquiry, and its relevance to communities outside the university")
  • Demonstrable influence on the interdisciplinary fields in which the candidate participates
  • Contributions to the fields beyond York, e.g., leadership in professional organizations, editing journals, etc.
  • Consistent contribution to governance at Departmental, graduate, college, YUFA, faculty and/or Senate levels Evidence of impact within these levels of York governance
  • Leadership in some of these service areas in some circumstances, evidencing commitment and accomplishment
  • Evidence of service at the national level (e.g.. sitting on SSHRC committees)
    Evidence of service in international academic, governmental and non-governmental organizations.
  • While not all candidates are likely to match this ideal profile, the expectation is that those who merit promotion will balance shortcomings in some areas with strengths in others in such a way as to make the candidate one of those "from whom the University receives its energy and strength."

Tenure and Promotions Procedures

The York Senate and the faculty union, YUFA, ratified new changes to the T and P process at York University in 2002/03.  The following documents should be consulted:

The Chair's office has copies of all relevant documents (from Senate, The Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies and the Department--for example, our template files, etc.) available to pre-candidacy and candidacy faculty.  Please consult the Chair's Assistant in S756.

YUFA members can now access a PDF presentation on York 's new T&P procedures.  Graciously provided by the University Secretariat, these files were originally prepared for T&P information sessions this Fall. These files provide a detailed perspective on the new T&P procedures for Faculties that are  departmentalized  (Arts, Atkinson, Fine Arts, Glendon, Science and Engineering) and non-departmentalized (Education, Environmental Studies, Schulich).

Teaching Workload Policy for Full-Time Faculty Members

In addition to contributions to scholarship in their fields and service inside and outside the university, the following are the expectations of the teaching workload for full-time faculty members in the Department of Social Science. The Chair of the Department (or her designate) is responsible for assigning teaching for all faculty members within the Department.

Undergraduate Teaching

Normal load

Full-time faculty members in the Department are expected to participate regularly in the teaching of introductory courses at the 1000 and 2000 level and in upper-level courses (3000 and 4000).

All full-time faculty in the Department are expected to teach 7.5 hours each year. A full six- or nine-credit course is 3 hours; a half-course is 1.5 hours. Thus, a normal load might be 2.5 full courses. This is frequently accomplished by teaching 3 full courses one year and 2 full courses the next for an average of 2.5 full courses per year.*

Teaching Assistant Workload Forms

Course directors with teaching assistants must submit teaching-asistant workload forms. The forms must be filled out and signed at both a September and a January meeting.

TA Workload Form (PDF)
Contact Lil Di Giantommaso, ext. 77799, lilianad@yorku.ca

Foundations courses

All Foundations course directors, regardless of the size of the course, receive 3 teaching hours.* Additionally, for larger foundations courses (300 students, or eight or more tutorial sections), course directors earn an additional one hour (designated as an "extra management hour") for each such course.* Foundations courses with ESL sections count all course sections together when determining if the course receives the additional management hour. The extra hour is treated similarly to all other teaching hours, and can be banked or paid out at the negotiated overload rate as is appropriate. Such a decision is taken in consultation with the faculty member. Only full-time faculty members are normally allowed to bank teaching hour credits. In unusual circumstances, multi-year CLAs have been allowed to bank or owe hours, on the understanding that by the end of their contract, their teaching hour balance has neither credits nor debits.

Tutorial sections in foundations courses receive 2 hours teaching credit. While course directors do not normally teach tutorials in foundations courses, efforts are made to accommodate the desires of faculty members to do so, especially for those teaching a foundations course for the first time.

In courses that are not foundations courses, but that have tutorials, a course management hour is normally given only in situations where the course size is 150 or more. For courses that are smaller than 150, the course director is normally assigned one tutorial section in order to yield the full 3 hours teaching credit.

It is possible to teach a course with marker-graders. For example, such a situation might occur in a second year course of more than 50 students but without tutorial sections.**

Directed-reading courses

Faculty members do not receive any teaching credit for offering directed-reading courses.

New tenure-stream faculty

New faculty will be expected to teach only two full courses (six hours) in their first year in a tenure-stream position.

Contractually limited faculty

Since contractually limited faculty are not expected to contribute to service in the university, they will normally be expected to teach three courses per year.

Normal Course Size

The maximum course size varies by year level of the courses. Tutorial sections, with two exceptions, are 25 students. The exceptions are second year Foundations courses where the tutorial size is 28 students and E.S.L. tutorials that are 15 students in size. Sizes for courses without tutorial sections are as follows:

Second year 50 students
Third year 35 students
Fourth year 25 students

Graduate Teaching

Provided the Department's undergraduate courses are adequately covered, faculty members who are members of a graduate program may normally request the right to teach the equivalent of a half-course in a graduate program in the Faculty of Graduate Studies every year. Such requests must be submitted in a timely fashion to the Chair of the Department.

Administrative Course Release

Within the Department of Social Science, five administrative positions receive course release hours. They are

Department Chair 1.5 full course releases (4.5 hours)
Undergrad Director 1.5 full course releases (4.5 hours)
Curriculum Coordinator .5 full course releases (1.5 hours)
Foundations Coordinator .5 full course releases (1.5 hours)

Program Coordinators

  • Small programs
  • Medium programs =100 majors and
  • Large programs =500 students - 1 course release
  • Stipends are as stipulated in the YUFA contract, Appendix P

*In team taught situations the hours available are shared; for example, a full course is normally shared equally between the two members teaching (1.5 teaching hours each). Similarly the extra foundations management hour is shared equally in team-teaching situations.

**In our collective memory no such situation has ever occurred within the Department. It has, however, been contemplated.